cleanandleanrecipes:

Buckwheat Chia Bircher Muesli (inspired by thesimpleveganista.com)


Ingredients

2 tablespoon rolled oats
2 tablespoons raw buckwheat kernels
2 tablespoon chia seeds
1/2 teaspoon or so vanilla
3/4 cup unsweetened almond milk, or non-dairy milk of choice
cinnamon, lottsss of it
3 figs
1/2 apple
a few almonds
a few pepitas

In small bowl combine oats, buckwheat, chia seeds, vanilla, milk, cinnamon. Mix well, cover and refrigerate overnight, or eat in one to two hours after it has set. Serve topped with diced figs, apples and nuts/seeds and a sprinkle of cinnamon…add a little more milk if desired. Serves one.

I am doing this acting class thing on Saturdays, which involves having to eat breakfast at 7am, and then lunch isn’t until about 1.30pm. On those days I need a breakfast that is going to give me the energy to roll around on the floor discover myself. Buckwheat and chia are stupidly filling, so I’ve been having this Bircher to get me through my emotionally demanding Saturdays.

(via yogachocolatelove)

1 year ago 45 notes

(via queerladarladoo)

1 year ago 204 notes

ecocides:

The world’s largest human DNA helix. San Francisco, CA (April 21, 2011)

1 year ago 1,001 notes

"Your children are not your children. They are the sons and daughters of Life’s longing for itself. They come through you but not from you, and though they are with you, yet they belong not to you. You may give them your love, but not your thoughts. For they have their own thoughts. You may house their bodies but not their souls, for their souls dwell in the house of tomorrow, which you cannot visit, not even in your dreams. You may strive to be like them, but seek not to make them like you."

- Kahlil Gibran  (via uni-tea)

(via peaceintheswirl-deactivated2014)

1 year ago 1,285 notes

(via yourpsychicjourneys)

1 year ago 62 notes

(via wanderingdanseur)

1 year ago 289 notes

hausofturkel:

Follow my Instagram
Haus_of_turkell

1 year ago 7 notes

blue-voids:

Aiman Halabi - Human, oil on canvas

(via hausofturkel)

1 year ago 2,265 notes
8th
March
94 notes
Reblog
buddhazen101:

thepaintedbench:

Sand Mandala 

I absolutely love the fact that after 4-6 months of painstaking work by hand these are then thrown out into the river upon completion with no hesitation whatsoever.  
Quite an amazing reminder of impermanence!

buddhazen101:

thepaintedbench:

Sand Mandala 

I absolutely love the fact that after 4-6 months of painstaking work by hand these are then thrown out into the river upon completion with no hesitation whatsoever.  

Quite an amazing reminder of impermanence!

1 year ago 94 notes

rawlivingfoods:

The Benefits of Sprouting

Sprouts are super easy to grow and incredibly nutritious. Buying sprouts from shops can be up to ten times more expensive than growing your own. Sprouts are one of nature’s true living superfoods - they are enzyme-rich, high in amino acid (protein) content, bursting with minerals and trace minerals, and are packed with chlorophyll. Sprouts are also healing and therapeutic, cleansing and alkalizing, and filled with antiaging antioxidants. Because they are so high in minerals and enzymes, they facilitate digestion, detoxification, and weight loss. What’s more, they taste fantastic. There is a wide selection of different types of seeds that one can sprout, so the variety and flavors available are virtually endless.

The Glass Jar Method

There are many different sprouting kit options, ranging from stackable plastic rings to glass jars, sprouting bags, and automatic sprouters. My favorite is the glass jar method. Sprouting with this simple system involves soaking your chosen seeds overnight and covering the jar with a mesh screen and rubber band. In the morning drain the soak water and rinse the seeds twice daily, placing them on a rack to drain during the day. Harvest them within three to seven days. Some of the easiest sprouts to grow are alfalfa, fenugreek, radish, broccoli, mung beans, onion, cabbage, mustard seeds, chickpeas, quinoa, lentils, pea sprouts, and wheat seeds. For most sprouts, continue to sprout them until they have developed a long tail or their first leaves have begun to go green. In the case of chickpeas, quinoa, pea sprouts, mung beans, and lentils, they are ready to eat as soon as their tails begin to unfurl or emerge from the seed.

(via naturally-vegan)

1 year ago 1,207 notes